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10/6/2014

CAMX 2014 preview: CoreLite

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CoreLite, Inc. (Miami, Fla.) is emphasizing the company’s two primary core materials, Balsasud balsa wood and CoreLite Board PVC foam board.

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CoreLite, Inc. (Miami, Fla.) is emphasizing the company’s two primary core materials, Balsasud balsa wood and CoreLite Board PVC foam board. Balsasud balsa is grown, harvested and milled in CoreLite-owned and operated farms and facilities in Ecuador. The Balsasud S.A. facility in Ecuador has been FSC (Forest Stewardship Council) certified by the Rainforest Alliance according to FSC Chain of Custody standards. Final processing into finished core materials is done in CoreLite’s Miami facility, the newest balsa production facility in North America.  CoreLite says that controlling production from forest to end user assures Balsasud customers the highest quality balsa core products.

CoreLite Board is a closed-cell PVC foam specially formulated to provide good physical properties. It is engineered to meet demands required for use in marine transoms, attachment points, floors, bulkheads, stringers, local reinforcement points, molds and tooling.  CoreLite Board is a stand-alone product and can be used with our without composite skins as a direct replacement for wood and plywood. The company says it has good fastener pullout strength, high flexural strength and stiffness, and is 27 percent lighter than plywood.

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