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10/6/2014

CAMX 2014 preview: Chomarat

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Chomarat (Le Cheylard, France) is featuring its C-PLY thin-ply fiber reinforcement systems, emphasizing the carbon roof/polyurethane roof panel for the Roding Roadster, made via resin transfer molding (RTM).

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Chomarat (Le Cheylard, France) is featuring its C-PLY thin-ply fiber reinforcement systems, emphasizing the carbon roof/polyurethane roof panel for the Roding Roadster, made via resin transfer molding (RTM). “Indeed, Chomarat’s carbon reinforcements in automotive structures and external hang-on body panels requiring a class A finish, are efficient and competitive solutions. We have developed with our partners a solution saving time-consuming rework, which can amount up to 60 percent of the costs per component,” says Francisco De Oliveira, automotive market director at Chomarat. C-PLY is also used in the VX1 KittyHawk, which is competing in the Awards for Composites Excellence (ACE) and the CAMX Awards (see Awards Pavilion at the show). The hybrid aircraft, designed and manufactured by VX Aerospace, minimizes its environmental footprint thanks to being powered by CNG (compressed natural gas). The first flight of the sub-scale aircraft took place in the U.S. on June 6, 2014. For railway and construction applications, Chomarat has developed ROVICORE FR, a fire-resistant reinforcement featuring glass fiber-based reinforcement with a halogen-free core. 

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