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4/28/2015

Binder for natural fiber composites

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BASF (Ludwigshafen, Germany) has launched a new binder, Acrodur Power 2750 X, designed for the production of natural fiber composites for automotive lightweight applications such as interior car door panels or shelves.

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BASF (Ludwigshafen, Germany) has launched a new binder, Acrodur Power 2750 X, designed for the production of natural fiber composites for automotive lightweight applications such as interior car door panels or shelves. As a low-emission alternative to formaldehyde-based reactive resins, Acrodur Power 2750 X is said to provide natural fiber composites high mechanical stability. At the same time, the product offers thermoplastic processability and, unlike traditional thermoplastic binders based on polypropylene, it allows the use of up to 75% natural fibers in lightweight components. BASF also says the use of Acrodur Power 2750 X helps make natural fiber components up to 40% lighter than conventional plastic products. Further, says BASF, the water-based binder is a health-compatible alternative to conventional formaldehyde-based reactive resins: Neither during processing nor as part of the final product does it release any organic substances. BASF says natural fibers bonded with Acrodur Power 2750 X can be processed using traditional thermoplastic cold-forming methods and combined in one single process step with complex plastic elements such as reinforcing ribs or supports. 

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