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11/18/2015

Aircraft interiors materials

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BASF Corp. (Florham Park, NJ, US) highlighted its aerospace material solutions at CAMX, for a broad range of applications, including cabin interiors, seating and structural materials.

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BASF Corp. (Florham Park, NJ, US) highlighted its aerospace material solutions at CAMX, for a broad range of applications, including cabin interiors, seating and structural materials. On display were composite panels intended for load floors and cargo containers (currently in trials) that are fully compliant with FAA fire/smoke/toxicity (FST) standards, thanks to the company’s Melapur halogen-free flame retardants. Also on display was an all-thermoplastic panel made with BASF’s Ultrason polyether sulfone (PES) resin for aircraft interiors, a lighter-weight alternative to phenolic-based resin panels.

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