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11/12/2012

High tensile modulus glass fiber

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Glass fiber manufacturer AGY has developed a new glass fiber with an unprecedented tensile modulus of 99 GPa/14,359 ksi.

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Glass fiber manufacturer AGY (Aiken, S.C.) has developed a new glass fiber with a tensile modulus of 99 GPa/14,359 ksi — a level AGY says is unprecedented in commercial glass fiber products. Trademarked as S-3 UHM Glass, the ultrahigh modulus material was developed using AGY’s advanced Modular Direct Melt (MDM) production technology. Its mechanical properties, however, are the result not only of the improved fiber manufacturing technology, but also, says AGY, an in-depth understanding of the constituent chemistries that enabled the company to realize a tensile modulus 40 percent higher than that of traditional E-glass fibers. The new material reportedly makes it possible for composites designers and manufacturers to use glass fiber reinforcement in applications previously open only to other types of advanced fiber. S-3 UHM is available in a range of formats, including yarns, rovings and chopped fibers.

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