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7/15/2014

UTC Aerospace to supply wheels, carbon brakes for 737 MAX

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UTC Aerospace Systems will manufacture wheels and carbon brakes for all models of the Boeing 737 MAX via its Landing Systems facility in Troy, Ohio, USA.

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UTC Aerospace Systems (Charlotte, N.C., USA) reported on July 13 that it has been selected by The Boeing Co. (Chicago, Ill., USA) to supply wheels and carbon brakes for all models of the Boeing 737 MAX. The company will provide the equipment through its Landing Systems facility in Troy, Ohio, USA.

UTC Aerospace Systems will provide the main wheel, nose wheel and carbon brakes for the 737 MAX. The carbon brakes use proprietary DURACARB carbon heat sink material, in service on more than 3,100 aircraft worldwide to provide a 35 percent brake life advantage over competitive products.

"We have supplied wheels and brakes for the Boeing 737 program since 1978 and we are proud to extend that long partnership to the 737 MAX. We look forward to supporting Boeing and this extremely efficient new airplane," says Jim Wharton, senior vice president, Landing Systems.

UTC Aerospace Systems designs, manufactures and services integrated systems and components for the aerospace and defense industries. UTC Aerospace Systems supports a global customer base with significant worldwide manufacturing and customer service facilities.

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