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5/30/2017

The fifth AFP machine from MTorres at work for A350 at GKN

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GKN manufactures the rear spars of the wings of the Airbus A350, while Spirit Aerosystems is responsible for manufacturing the front spars.

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The fifth AFP machine from MTorres (Pamplona, Navarra, Spain) for manufacturing the A350XWB wings has started production at GKN Aerospace (Bristol, UK). At its Western Approach plant in Bristol, GKN manufactures the rear spars of the wings of the Airbus A350, while the Spirit AeroSystems plant in Kinston, NC is responsible for manufacturing the front spars.

The installation of the fifth Torres fiber layup machines allows GKN to manage with Airbus' decision to achieve a maximum ratio of 13 sec/month. In addition, GKN has established more space in its facilities to be able to cover Airbus' future decisions on a longer version of the A350, which will imply new production capacity requirements and perhaps larger machines for larger components. Although all these additional equipment needs are yet to be defined, MTorres stated.

GKN also has, in this same plant, a Torres layup that manufactures the spars of the Airbus A400M.

Check out the following video to see how the configuration of the mold allows the MTorres machines to manufacture the two pieces that make up the IRS spar at the same time:

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