• PT Youtube
  • CW Facebook
  • CW Linkedin
  • CW Twitter
8/4/2014 | 1 MINUTE READ

Tecnatom upgrades inspection equipment for Turkish Aerospace Industries

Facebook Share Icon LinkedIn Share Icon Twitter Share Icon Share by EMail icon Print Icon

Modernizing electronics and software will increase capability and add value while minimizing cost.

Share

Facebook Share Icon LinkedIn Share Icon Twitter Share Icon Share by EMail icon Print Icon

Related Suppliers

Turkish Aerospace Industries (TAI, Ankara, Turkey) has selected Tecnatom (Madrid, Spain) to upgrade its obsolete inspection equipment. TAI actually bought the gantry type system — which was built by Tecnatom years ago for in-house use — from Tecnatom earlier this year. Though the mechanical and motion control components are in good condition, the electronics and software will be modernized to enable integrated through transmission and pulse-echo techniques for performing ultrasonic quality control on constant-profile flat and curved parts. The new system will meet the most stringent quality requirements demanded by Airbus suppliers for the control of aerospace parts, and will also improve productivity.

As part of its leadership in non-destructive testing, Tecnatom has developed inspection system upgrade services to meet specific customer demands. These can be carried out by means of technological evolution or the incorporation of new capabilities. Tecnatom also upgrades systems from other manufacturers no longer in existence or capable of the desired improvements.

“This second contract that TAI has awarded to Tecnatom this year will enable us to turn a system with very limited service into state-of-the-art equipment, in terms of ultrasonic electronics and instrumentation software for the control, acquisition and analysis of data, and incorporating new capabilities such as performing inspections with pulse-echo techniques. Improvement within this system will allow increasing productivity at a very adjusted price, and will add value,” states Tecnatom’s industrial market manager Antonio Tanarro. The upgrade for TAI includes technical assistance as well as staff training.

RELATED CONTENT

  • Thermoplastic composites: Primary structure?

    Yes, advanced forms are in development, but has the technology progressed enough to make the business case?

  • Ceramic-matrix composites heat up

    Lightweight, hard and stable at high temperatures, CMCs are emerging from two decades of study and development into commercial applications.

  • Composites 101: Fibers and resins

    Compared to legacy materials like steel, aluminum, iron and titanium, composites are still coming of age, and only just now are being better understood by design and manufacturing engineers. However, composites’ physical properties — combined with unbeatable light weight — make them undeniably attractive. 

Related Topics

Resources