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4/18/2016 | 1 MINUTE READ

Stelia Aerospace buys Cincinnati CHARGER Small Flat Tape Layer

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It will be used for layup of Airbus composite components, and is one of three recently sold to European Airbus suppliers.

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Stelia Aerospace Composites has purchased a new Cincinnati CHARGER Small Flat Tape Layer (SFTL) from Fives (Hebron, KY, US), which will be shipped soon to the company’s plant in Salaunes, France. It will be used for layup of Airbus composite components, and is one of three recently sold to European Airbus suppliers. “The Cincinnati SFTL has enjoyed wide appeal in Europe because of its compact size, productivity and wide range of capabilities, despite strong competition in that region,” said Steve Albers, composites product manager for Fives Cincinnati.

The Cincinnati SFTL is a bed-type machine that features a simplified, versatile tape head and integral vacuum layup table. The SFTL platform provides a right-sized solution to production of long, narrow, flat parts such as spars, stringers, beams, flaps and skins. It is designed and built using proven modules and technologies from larger Cincinnati tape layers.

Offered in two models, the Cincinnati SFTL produces laminates up to 1.4 m (55 in) wide on the standard machine, and 3.2 m (126 in) wide on the wide version. Either model can be configured with additional bed and vacuum table modules to increase the maximum laminate length in one meter increments to optimize the machine size for the customer’s facility. Both models share the same compact design that fits easily into low-bay facilities, and installs on a flat floor without special foundation.

According to Albers, the new generation tape head allows faster, simpler side loading of tape rolls up to 300 mm (12 in) wide and 650 mm (25.6 in) diameter. Common hardware permits layup of up to 300 mm (12 in) wide tape with minimal changeover time. The advanced head design also features tape flaw detection, integrated ultrasonic laminate cutter, and laser trace inspection for maximum system flexibility and performance.

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