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1/8/2019 | 1 MINUTE READ

SGL Carbon and Airbus Helicopters to intensify collaboration

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The two companies have agreed on framework contract that regulates the basic provision and further development of innovative carbon and glass fiber materials.

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Airbus Helicopters Germany (Donauwörth, Germany) and SGL Carbon (Wiesbaden, Germany) have agreed on a framework contract extending their cooperation to applications in the helicopter sector and further intensifying their partnership.

The two companies have been working together for years in the field of processing of composite materials for aircraft doors of the Airbus Group (Toulouse, France), and have recently defined the framework conditions in a joint agreement that regulates the basic provision and further development of innovative carbon and glass fiber materials. A first single project beyond existing cooperation concerns the delivery of structural parts for Airbus helicopters and is currently in preparation.

“The framework agreement is an important milestone and result of the trusting partnership of recent years,” says Andreas Erber, head of Segment Aerospace of the Composites - Fibers & Materials (CFM) business unit of SGL Carbon. “The teams on both sides have achieved a great deal in developing new bespoke material solutions for components in helicopters. In this process, SGL Carbon will contribute its holistic material expertise for the production of composite components.”

In addition to these business relationships, Airbus and SGL Carbon are also involved in various associations and research projects in the composites sector, such as the competence network Carbon Composites eV (Augsburg, Germany).

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