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10/9/2015 | 1 MINUTE READ

Quickstep, Thales Australia to collaborate on military vehicle

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This represents the first automotive project that will use Quickstep’s Qure and Resin Spray Transfer (RST) technologies.

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The Australian government has awarded defense contractor Thales Australia a $1.5 billion supply contract to build the next generation of armored vehicles for the Australian Defense Force. Quickstep Holdings (Bankstown Airport, NSW, Australia) has signed a letter of intent (LOI) with Thales Australia confirming Quickstep’s selection as exclusive supplier of the bonnet, side skirts and mud guards for the Hawkei vehicles. This represents the first automotive project that will use Quickstep’s Qure and Resin Spray Transfer (RST) technologies. Quickstep is planning to undertake the production of the Hawkei parts at its new automotive facility in Waurn Ponds, Victoria.

 “We are delighted that Thales Australia has secured the Hawkei project, and look forward to working with them on the next generation of our nation’s land forces,” said Quickstep’s CEO and Managing Director David Marino.

In addition to the the Hawkei project, Quickstep has an agreement to supply carbon fiber composite parts to an Original Equipment Manufacturer (OEM) beginning in early 2016. The company is also progressing discussions with a number of other vehicle producers regarding utilizing its advanced composites capabilities to manufacture automotive components and assemblies.

Quickstep’s Qure technology is said to “dramatically” reduce manufacturing times and costs for producing carbon fiber composite vehicle parts. The lightweight, corrosion-resistant parts also assist OEM’s compliance with U.S. and European fuel efficiency legislation, as the lower weight of car components reduces fuel consumption and carbon dioxide emissions. 

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