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7/17/2017 | 1 MINUTE READ

Owens Corning acquires Hughes Bros. rebar operations

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Owens Corning Infrastructure Solutions, part of the Composites business of Owens Corning (Toledo, OH, US), announced on July 6 that it has completed the acquisition of trademarked Aslan FRP rebar.

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Owens Corning Infrastructure Solutions, part of the Composites business of Owens Corning (Toledo, OH, US), announced on July 6 that it has completed the acquisition of trademarked Aslan FRP,  the concrete reinforcement business of Nebraska-based Hughes Brothers, Inc. (Seward, NE, US). Terms of the deal were not disclosed.

Aslan FRP produces and markets glass and carbon FRP (fiber reinforced polymer) products, also known as composite rebar, used to reinforce concrete in new and restorative infrastructure projects such as roads, bridges, marine structures, buildings and tunnels.

“Infrastructure represents an important area of focus for Owens Corning Infrastructure Solutions to both grow our business and provide tangible, long-term benefits globally,” says John Amonett, general manager, Infrastructure, Owens Corning. “The addition of Aslan FRP broadens our portfolio of composite solutions and adds new products that enhance the performance of concrete structures, while being lighter-weight and more corrosion-resistant than conventional steel reinforcements.”

“Owens Corning’s extensive portfolio and experience, combined with the company’s focus on infrastructure reinforcements, makes it the ideal owner to move the Aslan FRP business forward,” says John Hughes, president, Hughes Brothers, Inc. “This decision allows us to sharpen our focus on serving the high voltage transmission and distribution market.”  

Composite rebar represents a compelling alternative to steel reinforcements with advantages including corrosion resistance, improved durability, lightweighting, enhanced ease-of-installation, greater tensile strength and long service life. 

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