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Neenah Inc. acquires Vectorply Corp.

The closing is expected to be completed April 1.
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Specialty materials company Neenah Inc. (Alpharetta, Ga., U.S.) has signed an agreement to acquire composite materials supplier Vectorply Corp. (Phenix City, Ala., U.S.) a portfolio company of MSouth Equity Partners, for $155 million in cash. Closing is expected to occur on April 1.

With annual sales of over $70 million, Vectorply is a leader in the manufacture of high-performance composite materials used in a variety of growing end markets. Vectorply has grown its top line at a high single digit rate over the past five years, with EBITDA margins in the mid-20s. The company is focused in North America, with its customers and supply chain predominantly in the United States, and operates out of one manufacturing facility in the Southeastern U.S.

“Vectorply is well-known for its product capabilities, utilizing product-enhancing fibers such as carbon, glass and aramid to produce purpose-built, nonwoven reinforcement fabrics. The acquisition broadens our technical products platform, adding new capabilities that will further accelerate our ability to grow in existing, as well as new end markets,” says John O'Donnell, CEO. “I'm confident that with Julie Schertell’s leadership and Vectorply’s experienced management team, Neenah will deliver a seamless integration and continue Vectorply’s impressive record of profitable growth. Financially, this investment is an attractive use of capital, with a double-digit rate of return, and it will be immediately accretive to our margins and our earnings.”

Excluding one-time costs, the transaction is expected to be accretive to earnings in year one, with annualized accretion of over $0.25 per share. One-time acquisition and integration costs in 2020 are projected to be less than $2 million.

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