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Janicki Industries approved for Nadcap accreditation

US-based composites tooling and manufacturing specialist Janicki Industries has been granted Nadcap approval through 2020. 
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Janicki Industries (Sedro-Woolley, WA, US) reported on Dec. 11 that it has been approved for Nadcap accreditation until 2020. Nadcap accreditation indicates that Janicki’s Hamilton Facility is a qualified manufacturer of composite parts and tools.

Janicki says it has made several capital investments that helped it earn this accreditation, including implementation of non-destructive inspection equipment and processes, the addition of advanced testing equipment to its research and development lab, and expansion of its Class 8 cleanroom by 50% to accommodate larger parts and faster production speeds.

Janicki Industries is one of 11 composites suppliers in Washington State that are Nadcap-approved to make composite parts, and it is one of four suppliers in the state that has achieved 24 months merit. This means its manufacturing process controls are robust enough that auditors have certified Janicki for two year, rather than the one year normally granted.

Director of quality assurance of Janicki Industries, Bill Vaith, says, “This Nadcap qualification shows our aerospace customers that JI [Janicki Industries] is a premium supplier of composite parts and tools and that we meet the most stringent process requirements for manufacturing with advanced composite materials.”

President of Janicki Industries, John Janicki, says, We are pleased to achieve 24-month merit on our Nadcap certification and our customers can trust Janicki for their most challenging carbon fiber composite fly-away parts.

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