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6/11/2019

FAMACOM project to develop more efficient manufacturing process for aerospace parts

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The Spanish consortium, led by Aerotecnic, is using microwave curing for manufacturing large sandwich-structured composite parts.

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aerospace composites

Source | AIMPLAS

 

A consortium called FAMACOM, led by Aerotecnic (Cádiz, Spain), is developing a more efficient manufacturing process for lightweight aerospace parts, using microwave curing for manufacturing large sandwich-structured composite parts. Partners in the consortium include CT Ingenieros Andalucia, Inespasa (Seville, Spain), Titania (Cádiz, Spain),​​​​​​​ and researchers from Universidad de Cádiz, FADA-CATEC (Seville, Spain), and AIMPLAS (Valencia, Spain). 

The project research will reportedly is developing a patent that will enable even curing of sandwich-structured parts and overcome difficulties arising from the thickness and non-uniform nature of these assemblies. AIMPLAS’s contribution focuses on material selection and optimization of the microwave curing process.

FAMACOM is funded by the Centre for the Development of Industrial Technology (CDTI) with the support of the Spanish Ministry of Science, Innovation and Universities and the European Regional Development Fund (ERDF). The objectives of this project are aligned with the Factories 4.0 and Beyond strategy, as well as with the Societal Challenge on Smart, Green and Integrated Transport, which forms part of the National Plan for Scientific and Technical Research and Innovation for 2017-2020.

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