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9/11/2017 | 1 MINUTE READ

AnalySwift software used for composite rotor blade simulation

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VABS is a general-purpose cross-sectional analysis tool for computing beam sectional properties and recovering 3D fields of slender composite structures. 

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AnalySwift LLC (Salt Lake City, Utah) announced that EJ-Projects has licensed its VABS software for use in simulating composite rotor blades.

Based in the Netherlands, EJ-Projects is an engineering consultancy with specialties in modeling and simulation, loads, aeroelasticity and structural engineering. The company’s primary focus is in aerospace, turbo-machinery, and wind power technologies, and EJ-Projects has licensed VABS for composite rotor blade analysis projects, including an off-shore wind turbine project.

“We have had a relationship with EJ-Projects for some time and have been impressed with the work they have done, particularly in composite rotor blade analysis,” said Allan Wood, president and CEO of AnalySwift. “VABS provides an uniquely rigorous solution as a general-purpose cross-sectional analysis tool for computing beam sectional properties and recovering 3D fields of slender composite structures. This includes composite helicopter and wind turbine rotor blades, as well as other slender composite parts, such as landing gear, propellers and high-aspect ratio wings.”

“EJ-Projects uses VABS together with GEBT, an open source companion code to VABS, in design analysis focused on rotor blade dynamics,” said Eric Jansen of EJ-Projects. “Together with industry standard integrated load analysis software, EJ-Projects also employs VABS for design and certification of offshore wind turbines.”

“VABS is capable of rigorously decoupling an original 3D slender solid with complex cross- sections into a simple engineering beam model,” according to Wenbin Yu, CTO of AnalySwift. “With continuous development funded by the US Army spanning over 20 years for performance and robustness, VABS' accuracy has been extensively verified by its developers and users.”

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