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10/16/2017 | 1 MINUTE READ

Dutch team wins Bridgestone World Solar Challenge

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The Nuon Solar team from TU Delft University wins the 3,000-km Bridgestone World Solar Challenge for a record seventh time.

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The Nuon Solar team from TU Delft University (The Netherlands), driving its Nuna9 car, claimed its seventh title in the Challenger class, crossing the finish line in Victoria Square Adelaide, Australia, first in the 2017 Bridgestone World Solar Challenge. The World Solar Challenge pits teams racing solar-powered cars, starting in Darwin and finishing 3,000 km later in Adelaide. Most of the cars make significant use of composites.

Coming in second was the University of Michigan Solar Car Team, driving its torpedo-shaped Novum. The second place finish is the university’s best result in the race. Punch Powertrain Solar Team from Belgium, driving Punch 2, finished third for their best result since 2007. Nuna9’s average speed was 81.2 kmh. Novum’s average speed was 77.1 kmh. Punch 2’s average speed was 76.2 kmh.

Race organizers say Nuon took the lead early and never looked back. Strategists watched the weather, energy consumption and predicted the best way through the clouds. Nuon team manager Sander Koot said they adjusted their strategy and driving style to the weather conditions, with wind gusts of up to 60 kmh. Aerodynamics expert for the team, Jasper Hemmes, says drivers were instructed to position the solar car in such a way to profit from the winds as if it were a sailing ship.

Click here to see all results for the 2017 Bridgestone World Solar Challenge.

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