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3/15/2019 | 1 MINUTE READ

Composites One and IACMI to host two-day workshop

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The workshop, called “the Evolution of Composites,” will be held March 20-21 at Vanderbilt University in Nashville, Tenn., U.S.

Composites One (Arlington Heights, Ill., U.S.) and the Closed Mold Alliance will host a two-day workshop called “the Evolution of Composites,” in partnership with the Institute for Advanced Composites Manufacturing Innovation (IACMI) (Knoxville, Tenn. U.S.) March 20-21 at Vanderbilt University’s Laboratory for Systems Integrity & Reliability (LASIR) in Nashville, Tenn., U.S.

Attendees will hear the latest product and process developments in automation, additive manufacturing, 3D printing, closed molding, thermosets, thermoplastics, carbon fiber and more in a single workshop.

“Rather than focus on a single end market, this unique workshop will cover a variety of topics that are trending in the composites processing industry today,” says Marcy Offner, director of marketing communications at Composites One. “Our goal is to help manufacturers gain insights in product and process efficiencies that can positively impact their business.”

According to Offner, attendees will learn about non-destructive evaluation, process monitoring and control; see three side-by-side closed mold process demos, each producing the same part; watch live demos of 3D printing, DForm tooling and other processes; learn how low-cost carbon fiber is successfully used to produce an automotive part; and find out about the latest advancements in adhesives, infused tooling, light-weighting and more.

Registration and complete details, including a detailed agenda, can be found at compositesone.com. Registration is open until March 19.

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