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10/9/2017 | 1 MINUTE READ

Bloodhound speed record car begins tests

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October 6th concluded the Bloodhound SSC Team’s (Didcot, Oxfordshire, UK) first week of dynamic testing with the EJ200 jet engine-powered car on the taxiway at Cornwall Airport Newquay in the UK.

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October 6th concluded the Bloodhound SSC Team’s (Didcot, Oxfordshire, UK) first week of dynamic testing with the EJ200 jet engine-powered car on the taxiway at Cornwall Airport Newquay in the UK. The car is being developed to achieve a land speed record of 1,000 mph (1,610 kph), which is scheduled to occur in South Africa’s Haksteen Pan desert at some future date, beyond 2018 (see our article about the Bloodhound SSC here:https://www.compositesworld.com/articles/composite-air-brakes-stopping-the-worlds-fastest-car). 

Dynamic testing followed previous static tests, which saw the car tied to a ring fixed in the ground while the EJ200 jet engine was bought up to max reheat. The team are following their rigorous set of run profiles that see the car build speed safely and incrementally, culminating with high-speed trials that will be held on October 26.

This week’s trials enabled the team to prove the steering, brakes and tire grip with initial runs at speeds of up to 50 mph. Over eight runs the team built up speed as confidence and their experience of operating this massively powerful prototype race-car grew.

It was not, however, all plain sailing. On one of the early runs the front right carbon brake disc didn’t come up to temperature as the other three did. After a stripping down and bleeding the brake system, the carbon brake disc was found to have 'glazed', meaning it still refused to bite and come up to temperature. The glaze was eventually burned off after a number high-energy stops and all four brakes are now properly bedded in.

Andy Green, the car’s driver, says “Throttle response was fantastic and once we’d got all four brakes operating together, it handled like a real racing car. The Team have been putting in the long hours, working through minor issues of running a brand new vehicle, as we learn how to fine tune and develop the car and operating procedures. The airfield is proving to be the ideal test and development center for the world’s fastest car and we couldn’t have done this without their help.”

The Team will return next week to continue with the dynamic tests with the aim of reaching higher speeds and using higher power settings, in preparation for the full-power 200 mph public test runs at the end of the month.

 

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