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9/8/2015 | 1 MINUTE READ

Aeroscraft nears design freeze of VTOL heavy-lift cargo ship

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The composites-intensive Aeroscraft is a 66-ton capacity cargo-lifter designed for vertical takeoff and landing (VTOL) for delivery of product into hard-to-reach regions.

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The Aeroscraft Corp. (Aeros, Los Angeles, CA, US) revealed on Sept. 3 that the world’s first vertical takeoff and landing (VTOL)-capable heavy-lift cargo airship, the Aeroscraft, is now entering the design freeze phase for the ML866 (66-ton) version. Aeros is currently developing main component and test articles for the patented buoyancy management system known as COSH (control of static heaviness), as well as structural components for the operational and composites-intensive Aeroscraft.

COSH is Aeros’ proprietary and patented internal buoyancy management technology, which was successfully demonstrated in 2013 as part of US Department of Defense "Project Pelican," with the technology demonstration vehicle, known as Dragon Dream, measuring approximately 1:2 scale.

Aeros is planning to complete the configuration for the 66-ton payload capable Aeroscraft by end of 2015 as part of fleet development efforts now underway to satisfy global demand for the vehicle’s logistics capabilities.

“We are excited to reveal production is underway on the 555-9 long ML866, and committed to achieving FAA operational certification for the first deployable Aeroscraft in approximately five years,” explains Igor Pasternak, CEO of Aeroscraft Corp.

This new craft is expected to decrease the time and cost for delivering large project and container cargo around the world, especially to austere areas with no prepositioned infrastructure.

Read more about Aeroscraft here: "Don't call it a blimp!"

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