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6/21/2016 | 1 MINUTE READ

Adwen and LM Wind Power produce the world’s longest wind blade

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The 88.4m blade has been specifically designed for Adwen's AD 8-180 wind turbine, with 8 MW nominal capacity and 180m rotor diameter.

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Adwen, Bremerhaven, Germany, a 50-50 joint-venture between wind turbine OEMs AREVA, Paris Le Défense, France, and Gamesa, Zamudio, Spain, dedicated to offshore wind, has partnered with long-time blade manufacturer LM Wind Power, Kolding, Denmark, to produce the longest blade in the world. 

The 88.4m long blade has been specifically designed for Adwen's AD 8-180 wind turbine, with 8 MW nominal capacity and 180m rotor diameter. The first of these huge blades has been manufactured at LM Wind Power's factory in Lunderskov, Denmark and will be transported to a facility in Aalborg, where it will commence rigorous testing as part of Adwen's extensive product validation plan.

The engineering teams of both companies have been working together for months to design and integrate the blade. With the largest rotor in the industry (180 meters), the AD 8-180 now claims the highest annual energy production (AEP) of all wind turbines. 

"When you are building the largest wind turbine in the world, almost everything you do is an unprecedented challenge. We are going where no one else has ever gone before, pushing all the known frontiers in the industry. Having developed and integrated together with LM Wind Power the first unit of the longest blade ever and being able to start testing is a key step forward in the development of our AD 8-180 and proves that Adwen is at the forefront of the industry," said Luis Álvarez, Adwen General Manager.

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