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4/4/2019

Additive supplier Custom Grinders acquired by Cimbar

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Custom Grinders’ ATH additives for fire resistance will be added to Cimbar’s portfolio of inorganic minerals and additives.

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Mineral and additive supplier Cimbar Performance Minerals (Chatsworth, Ga., U.S.) announces its acquisition of Custom Grinders Inc. (Chatsworth), supplier of alumina trihydrate (ATH) and surface modified alumina trihydrate products, which are used as additives for fire-resistant composites.The company also recently opened a facility in Marietta, Ohio to serve the oil and gas industry in the northeastern United States.

“These additions further correspond with our strategic growth initiative and continued expansion of our performance mineral products,” says Albert Wilson, president of Cimbar.

According to Cimbar, Cimbar’s knowledge of mineral technology and microparticle science will enable it to expand Custom Grinder’s product range and to offer its customers and distribution network state-of-the-art processing facilities and professional support staff.

Cimbar has developed into a global business focused on minerals and additives, engineered to enhance the performance, appearance, processing and functionality in a markets including industrial, automotive, pharmaceutical and consumer-based applications. With expertise in inorganic materials, Cimbar’s product portfolio includes barium sulfates, talc, magnesium hydroxide, 100-percent recycled mineral products and, with the addition of Custom Grinders Inc., alumina trihydrate.

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