7/26/2017 | 1 MINUTE READ

CW Talks: James Austin, CEO, NTPT

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Our guest in episode 6 of CW Talks: The Composites Podcast is James Austin, CEO of Switzerland-based North Thin Ply Technology (NTPT). Austin talk about his early work in composites serving aerospace customers, before migrating to marine composites and, now, his current job leading material and automation specialist NTPT.

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The latest episode of CW Talks: the Composites Podcast, has been posted and is ready to be heard. Our guest in episode 6 is James Austin, CEO of Switzerland-based North Thin Ply Technology (NTPT). Austin talk about his early work in composites serving aerospace customers, before migrating to marine composites and, now, his current job leading material and automation specialist NTPT.

 

NTPT golf club shaft
Golf club shaft made with NTPT carbon fiber fabrics.
 

Austin is known in the composites industry as a thinker, and this CW Talks conversation proves that point. In particular, Austin talks about the need for increased automation, innovation and standardization in composites manufacturing — and his desire to see more qualified engineers and technicians come to composites.

You can listen to CW Talks three ways:

You can also check out previous episodes of CW Talks:

  • Episode 1: Arnt Offringa (GKN/Fokker)
  • Episode 2: Bryan Dods (IACMI)
  • Episode 3: Tom Haulik (Hexcel)
  • Episode 4: Pam Schneider and Mike Braley (A&P Technology)
  • Episode 5: Greg Mark (Markforged)

If you like what you hear on CW Talks, please write a review on iTunes or Google Play. If you have an idea for CW Talks, send a note to me, Jeff Sloan, editor of CompositesWorld, at jeff@compositesworld.com.

Happy podcasting.


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