9/12/2017 | 1 MINUTE READ

CW Talks explores foldable composites with Joseph Choma

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Clemson University professor Joseph Choma talks with CW about his work with foldable composites, and where they might find application. Hint: Choma teaches architecture. Video included!

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Joseph Choma, assistant professor, Clemson University

Joseph Choma, assistant professor of architecture,
Clemson University.

The latest episode of CW Talks: The Composites Podcast is up and features a conversation with Joseph Choma, assistant professor of architecture at Clemson University, who is spearheading research into the use of foldable composites for architectural and other applications.

The concept of foldable composites is fairly simple: Take a dry fiber reinforcement fabric, mask off seams to create fold points, infuse the unmasked fabric with resin, and cure the resin. Suddenly, you have a composite laminate with uncured, soft seams that allow the entire structure to be folded for easy transport and installation on site. And after the entire laminate is installed, the dry seams can be infused with resin to solidify the whole structure.

Choma, who was a composites novice coming into this research, talks about the source of his inspiration, the work he’s done so far, and where and how this technology might be applied. 

Catch the CW Talks podcast at any of these locations:

Masked fabric to create seams for foldable composite.

Masked fabric to create seams for foldable composite.

Fold lines in foldable composite.

Fold lines in foldable composite.

Composite structure folded for transport.

Composite structure folded for transport.

Folded composite structure at Clemson University.

Folded composite structure at Clemson University.

Close-up of folded composite structure.

Close-up of folded composite structure.


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