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10/7/2014

CAMX on-floor demonstrations

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There is no shortage of actual manufacturing taking place at CAMX, some of it designed to highlight capability, some of it to educate composite professionals on manufacturing processing methods. Whatever your level of interest, there are several manufacturing demonstration options on the show floor.

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There is no shortage of actual manufacturing taking place at CAMX, some of it designed to highlight capability, some of it to educate composite professionals on manufacturing processing methods. Whatever your level of interest, there are several manufacturing demonstration options on the show floor. Below is a list of exhibitors that have reported they are offering demonstrations:

  • RocTool, booth 4365: High-speed injection, heating, cooling
  • A&P Technology, booth 2447: Fiber reinforcement and braided products
  • Entec Composite Machines, booth 3561: High-speed filament winding
  • MarkForged, booth 1533: Continuous fiber additive manufacturing
  • Sandvik Process Systems, booth 3768: Continuous process systems
  • Composites One, booth 2570: Closed molding processes
  • SWORL, booth 3261: Reusable vacuum membranes
  • NETZSCH Instruments, booth 1643: Material analysis instruments

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