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9/13/2018

CAMX 2018 preview: Wabash

Originally titled 'Composite molding presses'
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Wabash MPI and Carver Inc. are featuring their standard and custom presses to highlight their composite molding presses for manufacturing and laboratory applications.

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Wabash MPI (Wabash, IN, US) and Carver Inc. (Wabash, IN, US) are featuring their standard and custom presses to highlight their composite molding presses for manufacturing and laboratory applications. Wabash MPI also offers standard and custom hydraulic and pneumatic presses for compression molding, vacuum molding, ASTM testing, laboratory and R&D applications. Its transfer presses reportedly offer precise molding of electrical components, medical products and other applications. Carver Inc. offers two-column and four-column benchtop, manual and automatic hydraulic laboratory presses with clamping capacities of 12-48 tons. Carver presses are suitable for various materials research, as well as analytical chemistry, lab testing, laminating and other applications. Booth H69.

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