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10/8/2018

CAMX 2018 preview: Thermwood

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Thermwood (Dale, IN, US) is featuring a mold fabricated using its new Large Scale Additive Manufacturing (LSAM) system, which can perform additive and subtractive manufacturing functions on the same machine.

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Thermwood (Dale, IN, US) is featuring a mold fabricated using its new Large Scale Additive Manufacturing (LSAM) system, which can perform additive and subtractive manufacturing functions on the same machine. The machine uses a fiber-reinforced thermoplastic material to build a near-net shape part; that same machine then uses subtractive functions to machine the part to the final shape. Thermwood says its new patent pending approach of melt shaping uses a compression wheel to form and compress the hot plastic melt as it is being extruded during the additive process, ensuring that each new layer is the proper width and thickness and that it bonds firmly to the previous layer. The company says it recently printed and machined a tool using 20% carbon fiber-reinforced polyethersulfone (PESU). Without coating or sealing the tool, Thermwood then tested it for vacuum integrity and achieved 28 inHg. Further, the company reports that after the vacuum line to the bag was removed, and almost 2 hours later, the vacuum had dropped 1 inHg to 27 inHg. Booth J60.

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