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10/4/2018

CAMX 2018 preview: TFP

Originally titled 'Nonwovens for surface finishing'
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TFP (Schenectady, NY, US) is emphasizing its nonwovens for composites surface finishing for industries including aerospace, automotive and sporting goods.

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Technical Fibre Products (TFP) (Schenectady, NY, US) is emphasizing its nonwovens for composites surface finishing for industries including aerospace, automotive and sporting goods. The company’s Optiveil range features an even fiber distribution that is said to provide a low-tack surface on the uncured parts and a high-quality surface finish after molding. The company also offers nano-functionalized nonwovens, metal-coated nonwovens, thermoplastic veils to increase fracture toughness and materials that provide effective integrated fire protection for composites. TFP’s products are said to impart functionality such as EMI shielding, conductivity and abrasion resistance, while also acting as effective adhesive carriers, resin flow media or galvanic corrosion barriers. Booth K57.

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