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9/13/2018

CAMX 2018 preview: Scott Bader

Originally titled 'Adhesives, resins, gelcoats and matched tooling systems'
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Scott Bader North America (Stow, OH, US) is featuring its lineup of adhesives, resins, gelcoats and matched tooling systems.

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Scott Bader North America (Stow, OH, US) is featuring its lineup of adhesives, resins, gelcoats and matched tooling systems. A particular focus at CAMX is on Scott Bader’s polyester, vinyl ester and hybrid bonding pastes under the new Crestafix brand name. Scott Bader bonding pastes are used in a range of applications and markets offering customers a choice of densities, gel times, color change, low shrinkage and ease of application. A new Crestafix sampling kit has been developed to offer customers the opportunity to sample and compare their chosen Crestafix options. The Crestapol range of high-performance urethane acrylate resins is also a key product focus, with particular emphasis on the fire-retardant (FR) properties of filled Crestapol resins and Crystic FR gelcoats and intumescent topcoats. Crestapol resins can be processed by open molding, infusion, RTM and pultrusion, even when heavily ATH filled (up to 200 phr). Booth Q47.

In the conference, JP Schroeder, North American FST market development manager at Scott Bader North America, is presenting “A Review of Closed Mold Processing of Highly Filled ATH Systems for FST Applications Namely Vacuum Infusion and RTM,” Oct. 18, 8:00 a.m., Clear Fork Ballroom D1.

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