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CAMX 2018 preview: SAT Plating

Appears in Print as: 'Precision plating solutions'


SAT Plating creates precision plating solutions to include polymers not traditionally commercialized, such as carbon fiber and high-performance PEEK and Ultem materials. 
#medical #peek #pei

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SAT Plating (Troy, MI, US) emphasizes its focus on creating precision plating solutions for carbon fiber composites and high-performance PEEK and PEI materials. The company’s suite of Adaptive Plating Technologies reportedly enable clients to expand their approach to product design, material selection and production methodologies. The company’s technologies and processes can be applied to a range of polymers and materials including plastics, films, fibers, membranes, fabrics, ceramics and glass. Hybrid and exotic materials can also be processed and plated, and include: glass fiber-reinforced PEEK, PEI and nylon; carbon fiber-reinforced  PEEK, PEI and nylon; and metallic-powder materials mixed with polymers and injection molding. Industries serviced include aerospace, medical, cyber security, industrial applications and more. Typical plated component enhancements include improved wear resistance, EMI/RF shielding, cosmetic enhancement, and improved strength and thermal performance. Booth M107.

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