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9/13/2018

CAMX 2018 preview: Republic Manufacturing

Originally titled 'Vacuum pumps for RTM, autoclaves'
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Republic Manufacturing (Dallas, TX, US) is exhibiting its line of vacuum pumps for composite manufacturing operations, including autoclaves, automation equipment, resin transfer molding and more.

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Republic Manufacturing (Dallas, TX, US) is exhibiting its line of vacuum pumps for composite manufacturing operations, including autoclaves, automation equipment, resin transfer molding and more. The Republic RX-Series oil-lubricated rotary vane pumps are a drop-in solution for vacuum needs. Air-cooled and direct-driven for continuous operation, they provide an airflow range up to 445 CFM and vacuum of 0.5 Torr. For a more energy efficient and low maintenance solution, Republic offers the RCV-Series rotary claw vacuum pumps, which reach a maximum continuous vacuum of 24 inches HgV. These pumps are dry-running, positive displacement pumps suited for oil-free applications. They use high-precision machined claws that rotate in synchronization without contact to create compression without wear. Republic also offers central systems in standard and custom configurations to provide a centralized source of vacuum. Booth ​​​​CC23.

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