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CAMX 2018 preview: Porcher Industries

Appears in Print as: 'Dry fibers for aerospace, automotive'


Porcher Industries and BGF Industries, specialists in high-performance technical textiles and composites, are presenting dry fibers for aerospace and automotive and the STELIA thermoplastic fuselage demonstrator. 
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Porcher Industries (Eclose-Badinières, France) and BGF Industries (Greensboro, NC, US), specialists in high-performance technical textiles and composites, are presenting dry fibers for aerospace and automotive and the STELIA thermoplastic fuselage demonstrator. 

The companies’ recently-launched range of dry fiber products are said to offer a new way of processing materials out-of-autoclave for the aerospace and automotive sectors. The products feature carbon fiber with a range of binder interfaces and are optimized for AFP-made preforms for thermoset resin infusion or injection. They are said to enable high-speed processing of complex parts.

The STELIA Arches Box TP, developed by Porcher Industries and five partner companies, is a thermoplastic fuselage demonstrator said to enable the first evaluation of this technology in a real industrial context. It features a Porcher Industries-developed organosheet from its PiPreg line as the material for the frames. Additional products offered include a range of fabrics, materials and other composites solutions for the automotive, industrial, construction, sports and leisure markets. Booth N37.

Porcher Industries thermoplastic composites R&D engineer Pierre-Yves Gandon is giving a presentation titled “Design to Cost Concept for Thermoplastic Laminates,” Thursday, 9:30 a.m., East Fork, Ballroom D3.

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