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9/13/2018

CAMX 2018 preview: Inman Mills

Originally titled 'High-performance thermoplastic yarns and fabrics'
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Inman Mills (Inman, SC, US) is introducing its Texim thermoplastic yarns and fabrics, which feature a sheath of polymer fibers covering a reinforcing fiber core.

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Inman Mills (Inman, SC, US) is introducing its Texim thermoplastic yarns and fabrics, which feature a sheath of polymer fibers covering a reinforcing fiber core. Polymer fibers for the sheath may be from polypropylene, polyethylene, polyester, nylon, polycarbonate, polyetherimide, polyphenylene sulfide or almost any thermoplastic fiber that can be extruded into a fine staple fiber. The ratio of sheath thermoplastic polymer fibers to the core reinforcing fibers can be adjusted, depending on consolidation and reinforcement requirements. Inman’s differentiating technology combines the reinforcing fiber core and the thermoplastic polymer in one process at the yarn level, prior to the fabric being woven. Unlike a film or a co-woven, says Inman, the resulting product allows for improved consolidation as the polymer fibers surround the reinforcing fibers and reduce the possibility of voids in the final composite. Booth J49.

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