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9/13/2018

CAMX 2018 preview: IKONICS

Originally titled 'Non-traditional machining process supports range of materials'
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IKONICS Advanced Materials Solutions (Deluth, MN, US) is showcasing its Precision Abrasive Machining (PAM), a non-traditional machining process.

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IKONICS Advanced Materials Solutions (Deluth, MN, US) is showcasing its Precision Abrasive Machining (PAM), a non-traditional machining process. PAM supports a range of materials such as carbon fiber, glass fiber, Kevlar, ceramic matrix composites (CMCs), silicon carbide, sapphire, glass, alumina, graphite and more. The process reportedly enables perforations in any shape and with clean edges, high-precision repeatability, fewer stresses or defects, complex curve capabilities and flexible and rapid design changes. No secondary machining services are needed. Suitable applications include engine liners, thrust reversers, blocker doors and other parts that require hundreds or thousands of perforations. PAM is said to provide a high degree of accuracy and repeatability within 50 µm, as well as fast turn-around and prototyping for design changes. Booth G90.

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