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9/13/2018

CAMX 2018 preview: IDI Composites International

Originally titled 'Thermoset molding compounds, R&D services'
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IDI Composites International (Noblesville, IN, US) is featuring its customized polyester/vinyl ester-based bulk molding compounds (BMC), sheet molding compounds (SMC), and an advanced line of Structural Thermoset Composites (STC - Ultra Performance Moldable Composites) that are manufactured in both sheet and bulk formats.

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IDI Composites International (Noblesville, IN, US) is featuring its customized polyester/vinyl ester-based bulk molding compounds (BMC), sheet molding compounds (SMC), and an advanced line of Structural Thermoset Composites (STC - Ultra Performance Moldable Composites) that are manufactured in both sheet and bulk formats. Company officials also will be available to discuss the IDI 3i Composites Technology Center, which serves as the research and development division of IDI, where the company generates and proves new ideas, approaches and materials to address the engineering and performance challenges of its customers. This division of IDI Composites International has helped develop Fortium high glass fiber composites, with 40-65% discontinuous glass fiber, and Ultrium carbon fiber composites. Booth X4.

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