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9/13/2018

CAMX 2018 preview: Entec

Originally titled 'Versatile, customizable filament winding systems'
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Engineering Technology Corp. (Entec, Salt Lake City, UT, US) is featuring its new line of standard filament winding systems, ranging from small tabletop models to premium production machines.

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Engineering Technology Corp. (Entec, Salt Lake City, UT, US) is featuring its new line of standard filament winding systems, ranging from small tabletop models to premium production machines. The smallest winder, SS, is a low-cost machine designed for use in laboratories, universities and light production facilities. Mid-range winders, SM, feature sturdy, modular construction for full-scale production and support a range of options including additional axes and spindles. The largest winder, SL, is designed for heavy industry and aerospace and supports mandrels up to 2m diameter and 15m long. Rounding out the catalog, the fastest winder, CXG, is a multi-spindle machine specifically geared toward pressure vessels and the high-output demands of automotive manufacturers. Entec also is emphasizing its custom equipment and process solutions. These systems range from filament winders to tape wrappers and fiber placement machines. Entec is a certified FANUC integrator and develops robotic solutions and process integration that support increased process flow and quality control standards in the industry. Booth F74.

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