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9/13/2018

CAMX 2018 preview: Elliot Co. of Indianapolis

Originally titled 'Versatile closed cell foam '
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Elliott Co. (Indianapolis, IN, US) is featuring its ELFOAM rigid unfaced polyisocyanurate (urethane) closed cell foam.

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Elliott Co. of Indianapolis (Indianapolis, IN, US) is featuring its ELFOAM rigid unfaced polyisocyanurate (urethane) closed cell foam core. ELFOAM products are available in 2-, 3-, 4- and 6-lb/ft3 densities supplied as blocks, sheets and custom shapes. With a temperature range from -297˚F to +300˚F and compatibility with polyester, vinyl ester and epoxy resins, the foam can be used for a variety of applications. It is compatible with an array of processes including hand layup, sprayup, vacuum infusion, resin transfer molding, lamination, pultrusion and filament winding. In terms of physical characteristics, it is said to offer high strength-to-weight ratios, chemical resistance, thermal insulation, and Class 1 fire performance, as well as low water permeability. It also can be easily machined, perforated and sliced. Booth U51.

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