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9/13/2018

CAMX 2018 preview: Compotool

Originally titled 'High-temperature, low-CTE tooling board'
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Compotool (Monroe, WA, US; Auckland, New Zealand) is featuring its inorganic tooling board made from specialized formulated calcium silicate materials that reportedly exhibit favorable thermal and process characteristics. 

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Compotool (Monroe, WA, US; Auckland, New Zealand) is featuring its inorganic tooling board made from specialized formulated calcium silicate materials that reportedly exhibit favorable thermal and process characteristics. This tooling board is said to be thermally stable and able to withstand temperatures of more than 1,000°F with minimal thermal conductivity. The board has a theoretical coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) of less than 3.3 x 10-6 F-1. The material’s low thermal conductivity, says Compotool, oven or autoclave cycle time and energy requirements are relatively low. The Compotool tooling boards are available in high-density (55 lb/ft3) CT850, medium-density (47 lb/ft3) CT750 and low-density (18 lb/ft3) CT300. These densities are formulated to be easy and fast to machine to high accuracy. Cutting is similar to wood and the material is nonabrasive, resulting in minimal tool wear. The different densities can be used in combination to reduce overall cost and weight. Compotool also provides matching hig- temperature adhesive and sealing systems that allows users the ability to build mold shapes that can be used for either a master model or for short run direct molds. Compotool tooling boards are compatible with resin systems that require high processing temperatures such as cyanate ester, benzoxazine, bismaliamide, polyamide and thermoplastic systems. Booth M43.

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