• PT Youtube
  • CW Facebook
  • CW Linkedin
  • CW Twitter
9/13/2018

CAMX 2018 preview: Cold Jet

Originally titled 'Mold and tool cleaning with blasted dry ice'
Facebook Share Icon LinkedIn Share Icon Twitter Share Icon Share by EMail icon Print Icon

Dry ice cleaning specialist Cold Jet (Loveland, OH, US) is conducting demonstration of mold and tool cleaning using the company’s i³ MicroClean system.

Share

Facebook Share Icon LinkedIn Share Icon Twitter Share Icon Share by EMail icon Print Icon

Dry ice cleaning specialist Cold Jet (Loveland, OH, US) is conducting demonstration of mold and tool cleaning using the company’s i³ MicroClean system. Dry ice blasting is a non-abrasive cleaning method that provides a composite tool cleaning solution that is fast, delicate and does not use chemicals or solvents. Dry ice cleaning uses recycled CO₂ in the form of solid dry ice pellets that are accelerated by compressed air through high-velocity nozzles onto the surface being cleaned. Through the combination of the kinetic and thermal effects, the bond between the contaminant and the surface is broken, thus cleaning the substrate. The dry ice pellets sublimate (return to their gaseous state) upon contact and expand 800 times to flush the contaminant from the surface. ColdJet says the i³ MicroClean enables the cleaning of intricate cavities that other methods cannot reach and extends the life of equipment by eliminating the need for chemicals, wire brushes and abrasive pads. It also is said to allow for increased cycles between preventative maintenance, while reducing scrap. Tooling used for, but not limited to, compression molding, resin transfer molding, extrusion, prepregging and wet layup are all suitable applications for dry ice blast cleaning. Booth P60.

RELATED CONTENT

  • Is the BMW 7 Series the future of autocomposites?

    BMW AG's Dingolfing, Germany, auto manufacturing facility is well known for churning out a variety of car models and types, and the 7 Series is among them, famous for its steel/aluminum/composites construction. Does this car represent the optimum of composites use in vehiicles? This plant tour of the Dingolfing plant looks at how composites on the 7 Series come together.

  • Taking the hand out of hand layup

    Hand layup has a long history in aerospace composites fabrication, but it's not well suited for automotive composites manufacturing, where volumes are much higher. But the discrete placement of fiber reinforcements still has value. Research is pointing toward automated hand layup that might help this process bridge the aerospace-to-automotive divide.

  • Additive manufacturing comes to composites fabrication

    The use of continuous fiber in additive manufacturing systems is not trivial, but it is being done. As this fabrication technology evolves and matures, options for applying it in everything from automotive to aerospace to consumer composites will expand tremendously, creating a host of new opportunities for the composites industry. Read here for who is providing what kind of additive manufacturing technology for use in composites fabrication.


Related Topics

Resources