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9/13/2018

CAMX 2018 preview: ATSP Innovations

Originally titled 'High-temperature, easy-to-apply, rebondable adhesive system'
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ATSP Innovations Inc. (Champaign, IL, US) is exhibiting its new line of ultra-high temperature resins (aromatic thermosetting copolyester – ATSP) for coatings, composites and stock shapes.

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ATSP Innovations Inc. (Champaign, IL, US) is exhibiting its new line of ultra-high temperature resins (aromatic thermosetting copolyester – ATSP) for coatings, composites and stock shapes. Featured is ATSP’s Self-Bond adhesive material. Self-Bond reportedly enables rapid bonding (<5 minutes), low mess and non-tacky high-temperature adhesion (28 MPa pulloff strength at 25, 4 MPa at 340). Self-Bond resins can be deployed via electrostatic powder deposition – allowing adhesive deposition rapidly over broad areas. In addition, Self-Bond allows two articles coated with ATSP to covalently bond to each other as solids throughout the entire process via bond exchange reactions. Other features of Self-Bond include touch-safe, non-tacky open time and an entirely solid-state process, meaning it is odor-free with no VOCs. Additionally, Self-Bond resins are rebondable, so long as the resin failure mode is cohesive rather than adhesive. ATSP Innovations also provides NOWE wear solutions for extreme environments. NOWE uses a blend of ATSP polymer with discontinuous carbon fibers and solid lubricants. NOWE bearings and stock shape materials are said to offer good wear properties, low coefficients of friction, working temperatures ranging from cryogenic to 300, oxidative stability, low moisture pickup, non-flammability, machinability with low dust production and compatibility with Self-Bond. Booth E80.

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