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9/13/2018

CAMX 2018 preview: Abaris Training Resources

Originally titled 'Composites manufacturing and repair training services'
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Abaris Training Resources Inc. (Reno, NV, US) is featuring its composites manufacturing and repair training services.

Abaris Training Resources Inc. (Reno, NV, US) is featuring its composites manufacturing and repair training services. Abaris recently relocated its Griffin, GA, US, operation to the Composite Prototyping Center’s (CPC) 25,000-ft2 facility on Long Island, NY, US, to enable expansion of the company’s curriculum. At CAMX, Abaris’ Lou Dorworth is presenting a pre-conference tutorial on Monday, Oct. 15, 1:00-4:00 p.m., titled “Enabling Technologies for Bonding and Joining Composites.” He will highlight various composite joining and bonding methods and techniques currently employed in the industry. Many Abaris Training partners and associates will also be located nearby on the exhibit show floor to answer questions about such products as repair equipment, vacuum bagging materials, additive manufacturing, tooling, laser projection, resins, fibers, prepregs, thermoplastics, and other associated material and process solutions. Booth R48.

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