| 1 MINUTE READ

CAMX 2017 preview: Olympus

Olympus (Waltham, MA, US) is featuring its EPOCH 6LT flaw detector, optimized for single-handed operation and high portability applications.
#camx

Share

Facebook Share Icon LinkedIn Share Icon Twitter Share Icon Share by EMail icon Print Icon

Olympus (Waltham, MA, US) is featuring its EPOCH 6LT flaw detector, optimized for single-handed operation and high portability applications. The unit fits in one hand weighs 890g, with a grip-oriented weight distribution. It attaches to a user’s leg or harness, and rope access technicians can secure the instrument for hands-free operation Users can navigate the menu using just their thumb, and it is dust and water resistance, and drop tested. For inspection, the unit is said to offer features and functions to meet the requirements of nearly any conventional ultrasonic inspection application, including all the core functionality of Olympus’ EPOCH 650 flaw detector. Booth E31.

RELATED CONTENT

  • Composites recycling becomes a necessity

    Boeing and Airbus each is generating as much as a 1 million lb of cured and uncured carbon fiber prepreg waste each year from 787 and A350 XWB production. If you include the entire supply chain for these planes, the total is closer to 4 million lb/year. And with the automotive industry poised to consume (and waste) more carbon fiber than ever, recycling of composite materials has become an absolute necessity. The technology is there, but the markets are not. Yet.

  • Ceramic matrix composites: Hot engine solution

    Disruptive designs for composites operation in 1093°C zones.

  • A critical market sector: Downhole composites in oil and gas

    Tremendous secrecy and non-disclosure has kept this profitable composites application out of the spotlight, while it has enabled the current shale oil energy boom.