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7/24/2017

CAMX 2017 preview: McClean Anderson

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Filament winding specialist McClean Anderson (Schofield, WI, US) is emphasizing, in booth B37, information on its Prototype, Education and Technology (PET) Center, devoted to research and development work and consumer education.

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Filament winding specialist McClean Anderson LLC (Schofield, WI, US) is emphasizing, in booth B37, information on its Prototype, Education and Technology (PET) Center, devoted to research and development work and consumer education. The PET center features:

  • 4-Axis Super Hornet filament winding machine with a maximum winding envelope of 760 mm diameter by 2000 mm long
  • 4-spool Digital-Electronic Tensioning System, which accommodates standard 75-mm core outside pull materials with a maximum spool size of 300 mm diameter by 13.6 kg; tension range is 9.0-90 N
  • 12-spool stationary Bookshelf Creel — spools of center-pull fiber are placed onto shelving and fiber is redirected through a series of ceramic eyelets
  • Forced-air curing oven capable of 260°C with data logging and thermal profiling
  • Variety of wet-winding and towpreg fiber delivery tooling

 

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