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CAMX 2017 preview: L&L Products

L&L Products (Romeo, MI, US) is introducing its latest technology, Torque Retention, Isolation, and Sealing Solutions, an expandable, polymeric sealant material with embedded alumina rigid, non-conductive spacers that provide a direct load path to maintain fastener clamp forces.
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L&L Products (Romeo, MI, US) is introducing its latest technology, Torque Retention, Isolation, and Sealing Solutions, an expandable, polymeric sealant material with embedded alumina rigid, non-conductive spacers that provide a direct load path to maintain fastener clamp forces. L&L says this technology is unique as it allows torque retention, isolation and sealing simultaneously. The product is currently being implemented in the automotive industry to promote lightweighting by allowing carbon fiber-to-metal and metal-to-metal joining without the concern of corrosion caused by the formation of galvanic cells. In addition, it is said to be effective for sealing door, hood and liftgate hinges. L&L Products’ latest sealing solutions are either dry to the touch or tacky and can be heat-bonded, adhered to an interface surface or mounted directly to a bolt. The technology is designed and engineered using 0.5 mm or 1 mm diameter spheres embedded in sealing material and achieve less than 3% torque fall off. Booth B23.

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