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7/24/2017

CAMX 2017 preview: Innegra Technologies

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Innegra Technologies (Greenville, SC, US) is highlighting its Innegra high-modulus polypropylene fiber, used in composite and textile applications to increase toughness, durability, damping and improve signal transmission.

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Innegra Technologies (Greenville, SC, US) is highlighting its Innegra high-modulus polypropylene fiber, used in composite and textile applications to increase toughness, durability, damping and improve signal transmission. The Innegra S fiber technology, commercialized in 2012, continues expansion in new applications, which can be seen in the Innegra booth: Boot insolves, radomes, blast- and ballistic-resistant structures, transportation. Innegra S is characterized as low density (0.84 g/cm3 bulk density), tough, flexible and ductile, moisture and chemical resistant, temperatures resistant (-100°C to 60°C operational range), has a low dielectric constant (Dk = 2.2) and loss factor (Df = 0.0009) and is low cost. Booth Q70.

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