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7/23/2017

CAMX 2017 preview: Hennecke

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Hennecke Inc. (Lawrence, PA, US) is emphasizing the composite license plate holder of the KTM 1290 Super Duke R, a 1300-cc, 170-hp, V-engine high-performance motorcycle.

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Hennecke Inc. (Lawrence, PA, US) is emphasizing the composite license plate holder of the KTM 1290 Super Duke R, a 1300-cc, 170-hp, V-engine high-performance motorcycle. Hennecke worked as part of the R.A.C.E. project (Reaction Application for Composite Evolution) to industrialize the new CAVUS-technology from KTM Technologies, which allows the production of hollow composite parts using an automated high-pressure resin transfer molding (HP-RTM) process. This technology was applied to the license plate holder and helped reduce the weight from 765g to 265g, a weight savings of 60%. The Hennecke STREAMLINE resin metering machine was used in the HP-RTM process and reportedly played a critical role in development of the license plate holder. STREAMLINE includes pressure control, sensors in the mixhead outlet, hydraulically controlled back-pressure function and mold filling monitoring. Booth K56. 

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