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8/18/2017 | 1 MINUTE READ

CAMX 2017 preview: General Plastics

Originally titled 'Lightweight Material Provides an RF-Transparent Protective Layer for Radome and Antenna Applications'
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General Plastics Mfg. Co. (Tacoma, WA, US) is showcasing its new LAST-A-FOAM RF-2200, a lightweight material that provides an RF-transparent protective layer for radome and antenna applications.

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General Plastics Mfg. Co. (Tacoma, Washington) is showcasing its new LAST-A-FOAM RF-2200, a lightweight material that provides an RF-transparent protective layer for radome and antenna applications. RF-2200 is a high-performing closed-cell polyurethane foam used in applications where low dielectric constant and low heat loss are necessary. This foam series, initially offered in 3-, 4- and 6-pcf sheets or blocks, may be provided in custom densities to satisfy specific dielectric performance requirements.

Extremely large blocks are also available, enabling customers to machine complex shapes without the need to bond sheets together. These materials can be used in composites applications that require processing temperatures up to 350°F/177°C. In addition to its extended thermal processing capabilities, its fine cell structure and high dimensional stability are said to make it an ideal for andwich panels and complex shapes made to tight tolerances. LAST-A-FOAM RF-2200 is a closed-cell polyurethane, it intrinsically prevents water uptake.

Even if exposed to rain, snow, sea spray or other moisture, the company says its dielectric performance will remain undiminished. General Plastics also is featuring its premier line of dimensionally-stable core materials and ready-to-use tooling board, which satisfy demanding physical properties, flammability performance and processing requirements. LAST-A-FOAM FR-3800 FST polyurethane foam core satisfies fire, smoke and toxicity (FST) requirements and Ohio State University (OSU) heat release standards. Because it withstands process temperatures up to 310°F154°C, General Plastics says it provides a large processing window to manufacture composite parts. It is available in custom sizes and thickness and in densities of 3-40 pcf. Finally, LAST-A-FOAM FR-4700 is the company’s ready-to-use high-temperature tooling board. These are dimensionally stable, non-abrasive and can be with machined with standard high-speed steel cutting tools. In addition, it withstands peak temperatures up to 400°F/204, making it suitable for high-temperature curing prepregs, vacuum forming and prototype machining. Booth R46.

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