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CAMX 2017: All the reports

CAMX 2017 was postponed by Hurricane Irma, but no worse for the delay. The largest composites event in the world’s largest composites market featured a variety of noteworthy materials, technologies and products that reinforced the strength and dynamism of the composites industry.
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CAMX 2017 was postponed by Hurricane Irma, but no worse for the delay. The largest composites event in the world’s largest composites market featured a variety of noteworthy materials, technologies and products that reinforced the strength and dynamism of the composites industry.

CompositesWorld was there and offers these reports:

And mark your calendars now for CAMX 2018, Oct. 15-18 in Dallas, TX, US.

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