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9/8/2016 | 3 MINUTE READ

CAMX 2016 Exhibitor Previews: Part 2

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CAMX, in its third year, is growing and expanding, and the quantity and quality of new products and technologies being introduced at the show is impressive. CAMX Connection asked exhibitors to tell us about the products they will feature, and the response has been tremendous. This week features Part 2 of 2 of the CAMX 2016 Exhibitor Previews.

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CAMX, in its third year, is growing and expanding, and the quantity and quality of new products and technologies being introduced at the show is impressive. CAMX Connection asked exhibitors to tell us about the products they will feature, and the response has been tremendous. This week features Part 2 of the CAMX 2016 Exhibitor Previews. 

The below list includes exhibitor name, a description of the technology or product being featured and a link to additional information. The exhibit hall at CAMX features more than 550 exhibitors offering a range of products, including resins, fiber reinforcements, machinery, tooling material, software, fabrication services, training services and more.

CAMX will be held Sept. 26-29, at the Anaheim Convention Center in Anaheim, California. Exhibit floor hours are 9:30 am-5:00 pm, Tuesday, Sept. 27 and Wednesday, Sept. 28. Exhibit floor hours are 9:30 am-1:00 pm on Thursday, Sept. 29.

For more information about CAMX, including conference schedule, exhibitor list and registration, visit www.thecamx.org.

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