SABIC opens polypropylene compounding plant in Mississippi

Bay St. Louis, Miss., plant will supply SABIC PP compounds and SABIC STAMAX long glass fiber-filled PP composites for automotive applications.

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SABIC Innovative Plastics (Pittsfield, Mass., USA) on Nov. 1 officially opened its specialty polypropylene (PP) compounding operation at its Bay St. Louis, Miss., USA, manufacturing site. The new compounding operation will supply SABIC PP compounds and SABIC STAMAX long glass fiber-filled PP (LGFPP) composites for automotive applications.

SABIC’s new PP operation answers fast-accelerating demand from automotive OEMs and tiers for local supply of globally-consistent PP materials in North America, supporting production of regional and global vehicle platforms. This is the second time in 17 months that SABIC has opened a PP compounding facility, having celebrated the start-up of its Genk, Belgium, plant in June 2010.

“In today’s fast-paced automotive industry, we continually strive to help our customers respond to new challenges and demands,” said Gregory A. Adams, vice president, Innovative Plastics, Automotive. “One of those challenges is the movement of many OEMs towards global vehicle platforms, with the resulting demand for high-quality, consistent materials that meet specifications across multiple regions. With this investment in Bay St. Louis, we have significantly boosted our capability to meet that demand and deliver even more responsiveness to our global customers, their engineering teams, and suppliers.”

SABIC notes that PP materials in the automotive sector have shown steady growth over several decades – at about 3 to 5 percent per year, on average – and have replaced metals and other polymers in various parts and components. Today, PP compounds are the preferred solution in many automotive applications, including bumper fascia, instrument panels (IPs), door panels, interior trim and other parts.
 

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